Tag Archives: equifax

Equifax Take-aways

By now, you must have heard about the Equifax breach that may have affected up to 143 million records of user people’s information. At this point, I don’t think they can confirm exactly how many records were actually compromised, leading to going with the larger of the numbers just to be safe. While many are quick to jump to conclusions and attempt to Monday morning quarterback what they did or didn’t do to get breached, I like to focus on what we can learn for our own organizations. There are a few topics I want to discuss that hopefully will be useful within your organization.

Patching

Well, it appears to be pretty clear that the avenue of attack was a Struts patch that was missing on the server. The patch was apparently released a few months prior to the attack, or at least acknowledgement of the attack. On the surface, patching appears to be a pretty easy task. A patch is released, you apply it.

Simple, right?

Patching is actually much more complex than that. It may be that simple when you have a single system to work with and maintain with very few software packages. Unfortunately, that is not the reality for so many places. Many organizations are dealing with hundreds or even thousands of systems to attempt to keep fully patched. This is a pretty big task, even if there were no other variables. Automate it they say. Sure, automation can be done, and needs to be done. How can anyone patch that many systems in a reasonable time frame manually?

There are other factors to consider. First, lets consider that there are many different types of patches. You have patches for the operating system, patches for applications, patches for frameworks, even patches for client-side libraries. Does your automation cover all of these sources? Some software has automatic update capabilities and will update on their own. Others require that you explicitly go out and download the patch and apply it.

Second, you have custom written applications with millions of lines of code pulling in multiple frameworks and packages to make development easier. It would be foolish to apply the patch without testing it first. This becomes more of a challenge with application patches because the entire application needs to be retested. This is more than a test to make sure the computer still boots. This needs to make sure that all the functionality, especially that functionality around the component is still properly functioning. The testing alone can be a time consuming piece. Add on to that if the patch makes any other changes within the code that breaks something. How bad does it break it. How much code needs to be rewritten for your custom code to work correctly again? Does that component have other components that are dependent on that version? Does this end up affecting other components?

Finally, who is tasked with patching the systems? Is this defined within the business? Are the same people that apply OS patches to the server the ones responsible for the application component patches? How do they track those type of patches? Do they need to get the go ahead from the application team that the patch is OK to implement?

As you can see, there are a lot of factors that go into apply what may appear to be a simple patch. What it highlights to me is the importance of understanding what components our application uses, how they interact with each other, and understanding how patches are applied when made available. Worst case scenario, we didn’t even know a patch was released.

Patching, however, is just one control for helping protect our systems. Similar to how input validation is a control to help with injection attacks. We shouldn’t be relying on it alone. The Equifax breach shows this well, that we must consider other controls in place in the event another control breaks down.

Encryption

I hear a lot of people talk about the data should have been encrypted. I believe that to be an easy statement to make, but without more details on how the data was actually accessed, it is not very helpful. Hopefully, your organization has a data classification policy. Hopefully, that data classification policy describes how data should be protected. This is the policy that determines how data should be protected and it should exist. If you have not seen this policy, ask for it.

Now that we know some data needs to be encrypted, what is the right method to use? Should we use disk encryption or column level encryption? Should we use Tokenization? The each have their pros and cons. Maybe the answer is you have to implement all of them, just to be safe, but how might that affect your ability to have a high performing functioning application?

You may decide to implement disk encryption for your database. That is a good step, in the event that someone is able to steal the actual files of the database. That doesn’t help much if the application has a vulnerability that allows access to the data that the attacker can just enumerate through. This can be similar to column level encryption as well. Often times application flaws may be able to bypass the encryption if incorrectly implemented. I guess at the very least, you get to say the data was encrypted.

The point with encryption is to make sure you know what you are doing and how you are implementing it. What attack vectors will it protect against and which ones may still be vulnerable. If you are going to take the time to implement it, it is important to make the best use of it.

Auditing and Logging

Auditing and Logging are important parts of the security of an application. They help us see and act upon events that may be malicious. How do you get vision into 3rd party components, like Struts, to see what they are doing? Are you relying on system event logs if the component throws an exception? Within our own applications we can use the logging to identify queries run, data accessed, and authorization failures, etc. When a system gets compromised, that logging may not be useful. It may be a combination of system and application events that help identify an attack as it is happening or after the fact. This is a great reminder that logging mechanisms can cross boundaries and this needs to be reviewed. Take a moment to look at how your applications and your web server are configured to identify potential malicious attacks. Consider different attack scenarios and see how those may get logged and if/when someone might see them.

Risk Management

Business run on the concept of taking risks. Sometimes this works in favor of the organization, sometimes not. In order to make better decisions, they must understand the risks they face. In a situation like this, we know there may be a patch available for a platform. The patch is critical since it allows for remote code execution. But what was known about the risk? What applications were effected on that server? What type of data did those applications maintain? Where does that application fit into our business model? Often times, we don’t look at the real details of a vulnerability or risk, rather we focus on the numbers. A patch that may compromise a system with no records and access is very different than one that relates to all your customer data that may be sensitive.

Don’t mistake this as an alternative to patch management. It is, however, a reality that in the midst of doing business, decisions will be made and not all of them will be popular. When working in your organization, think about the information you may be providing in regards to the decision making process. Is it sufficient? Does it tell the whole story?

Wrap Up

Companies are always at risk of being breached. As we see new breaches appear in the news we need to take a little time to skip the hype and personal opinions, and take a look at what it means to our programs. Look for the facts of what happened, how decisions may have been made, and the effect those had on the organization. Then apply that to your organization. Maybe you learn a new perspective on how a vulnerability can be used. Maybe you see a control that was bypassed that you also use and you want to review how your processes work. In any case, there are lessons we can learn from any situation. Take those and see how they can be used to help your processes and procedures to provide security in your organization.